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Nutrient Information

Understanding CEC

Prevent Nitrogen Loss

Bio-Stimulants

Wet Chemistry

NPK Fertlizer and Humic Acid

Potential Crop Production


Structural Nutrients

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  • Hydrogen also is necessary for building sugars and building the plant. It is obtained almost entirely from water. Hydrogen ions are imperative for a proton gradient to help drive the electron transport chain in photosynthesis and for respiration

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  • Oxygen by itself or in the molecules of H2O or CO2 are necessary for plant cellular respiration. Cellular respiration is the process of generating energy-rich adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via the consumption of sugars made in photosynthesis. Plants produce oxygen gas during photosynthesis to produce glucose but then require oxygen to undergo aerobic cellular respiration and break down this glucose and produce ATP

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  • Carbon forms the backbone of many plants biomolecules, including starches and cellulose. Carbon is fixed through photosynthesis from the carbon dioxide in the air and is a part of the carbohydrates that store energy in the plant

Primary Macronutrients

The primary nutrients are nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. You may be most familiar with these three nutrients because they are required in larger quantities than other nutrients. These three elements form the basis of the N-P-K label on commercial fertilizer bags. As a result, the management of these nutrients is very important. However, the primary nutrients are no more important than the other essential elements since all essential elements are required for plant growth. Remember that the ‘Law of the Minimum’ tells us that if deficient, any essential nutrient can become the controlling force in crop yield.

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  • Necessary for formation of amino acids, the building blocks of protein
  • Essential for plant cell division, vital for plant growth
  • Directly involved in photosynthesis
  • Necessary component of vitamins
  • Aids in production and use of carbohydrates
  • Affects energy reactions in the plant

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  • Involved in photosynthesis, respiration, energy storage and transfer, cell division, and enlargement
  • Promotes early root formation and growth
  • Improves quality of fruits, vegetables, and grains
  • Vital to seed formation
  • Helps plants survive harsh winter conditions
  • Increases water-use efficiency
  • Hastens maturity

  • Carbohydrate metabolism and the break down and trans-location of starches
  • Increases photosynthesis
  • Increases water-use efficiency
  • Essential to protein synthesis
  • Important in fruit formation
  • Activates enzymes and controls their reaction rates
  • Improves quality of seeds and fruit
  • Improves winter hardiness
  • Increases disease resistance

Secondary Macronutrients

The intermediate nutrients are sulfur, magnesium, and calcium. Together, primary and intermediate nutrients are referred to as macronutrients. Macronutrients are expressed as a certain percentage (%) of the total plant uptake. Although sulfur, magnesium, and calcium are called intermediate, these elements are not necessarily needed by plants in smaller quantities. In fact, phosphorus is required in the same amount as the intermediate nutrients, despite being a primary nutrient. Phosphorus is referred to as a primary nutrient because of the high frequency of soils that are deficient of this nutrient, rather than the amount of phosphorus that plants actually use for growth.

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  • Utilized for Continuous cell division and formation
  • Involved in nitrogen metabolism
  • Reduces plant respiration
  • Aids trans-location of photosynthesis from leaves to fruiting organs
  • Increases fruit set
  • Essential for nut development in peanuts
  • Stimulates microbial activity

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  • Key element of chlorophyll production
  • Improves utilization and mobility of phosphorus
  • Activator and component of many plant enzymes
  • Directly related to grass tetany
  • Increases iron utilization in plants
  • Influences earliness and uniformity of maturity

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  • Integral part of amino acids
  • Helps develop enzymes and vitamins
  • Promotes nodule formation on legumes
  • Aids in seed production
  • Necessary in chlorophyll formation (though it isn’t one of the constituents)

Micronutrients

The remaining essential elements are the micronutrients and are required in very small quantities. In comparison with macronutrients, the uptake of micronutrients is expressed in parts per million (ppm, where 10,000 ppm = 1.0%), rather than on a percentage basis. Again, this does not infer that micronutrients are of lesser importance. If any micronutrient is deficient, the growth of the entire plant will not reach maximum yield (Law of the Minimum).

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  • Essential of germination of pollen grains and growth of pollen tubes
  • Essential for seed and cell wall formation
  • Promotes maturity
  • Necessary for sugar trans-location
  • Affects nitrogen and carbohydrate

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  • Not much information about its functions
  • Interferes with P uptake
  • Enhances maturity of small grains on some soils

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  • Catalyzes several plant processes
  • Major function in photosynthesis
  • Major function in reproductive stages
  • Indirect role in chlorophyll production
  • Increases sugar content
  • Intensifies color
  • Improves flavor of fruits and vegetables

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  • Promotes formation of chlorophyll
  • Acts as an oxygen carrier
  • Reactions involving cell division and growth

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  • Functions as a part of certain enzyme systems
  • Aids in chlorophyll synthesis
  • Increases the availability of P and CA

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  • Required to form the enzyme “nitrate reductas” which reduces nitrates to ammonium in plant
  • Aids in the formation of legume nodules
  • Needed to convert inorganic phosphates to organic forms in the plant

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  • Aids plant growth hormones and enzyme system
  • Necessary for chlorophyll production
  • Necessary for carbohydrate formation
  • Necessary for starch formation
  • Aids in seed formation